Write Whatever

I’ve had a lot of trouble writing my current WIP.  I feel like I’ve been working on it forever, but I don’t know where the plot is going.  I don’t know how to write a contemporary, I don’t know what the stakes are, and I just feel burned-out when I try to work on it.  I’ve just felt blehhhh every time I sat down to write.  I’d open the world document and just stare at the screen, unable to lift a finger.

So.  That’s fine.  Sometimes, stories do that to us.  Sometimes, they are just persnickety and don’t want to be written.

The important, thing however, is to not stop writing.  If one story isn’t working, and you’ve taken some time off to read and think, and you come back to it, and it’s still not working, (and you’ve repeated this ad nauseum) then it’s time to write something else.

Write something different for a while.  Have another novel you’re writing?  Work on that.  Have something you should be editing?  Work on that.  Want to play around with poetry?  Do it!  Have a song you want to write?  Write it!  It doesn’t matter.  Write short stories, write blog posts, write poetry – heck, if you want to, even write fanfiction.  Do whatever it takes to get your creative-gears moving again.

Sometimes when I hit a wall in a project, my instinct is to just sit and stare at the wall.  And complain about the wall.  And study the wall.  And write blog posts about the wall.  But maybe what I need to be doing instead is writing a different project for a while.

Does that mean I’m totally abandoning this project that I’ve spent so much time working on?  Probably not.  But I’m just not going anywhere with it right now.  So let’s go somewhere else instead.

Which leads me to my other point for today: write what excites you.  I write to escape, to go to a world that I love, to meet people that only exist in my head.  I write for fun, for adventure.  And the novel I was trying to write doesn’t have any adventures.

So, I’m writing other stuff.  I’ve written some really fun fanfiction.  I’ve written some short blurbs and beginnings of stories.  And now I’m working on re-writing/ finishing/ installing a plot into an old novel that I adore and want to breathe life into.  And for the first time in many weeks, I’m excited about writing.  I’m excited to be returning to this other story, to this other world.  It’s a bit daunting, but it’s also the most fun I’ve had with a WIP in a long time.

Let your imagination run wild.  Write whatever the heck you want to.  Adventure awaits.

adventure is out there!

 

I’m Back!

Hey guys!  I’m home now, so you can count on consistent Motivational Mondays for the rest of the summer.  (Probably.)

hello 10

I had a great time, traveling and then going to summer camp.

I especially enjoyed a re-read of Since You’ve Been Gone (review here), a very light and fun summer story.

And now that I’ve had my time away, I’m ready to hunker down and get going on this story that’s in my head.  I think it’s time to set some goals.

How about a minimum of 500 words a day, 6 days a week?  For the rest of July and the first week of August.

You’ll hear about my progress every Monday.

I’m writing my story.  Go write yours.  Set little goals.  Set big goals.  Have fun.  Read great books.  Go to summer camp.  Write your story.

I’ll see you folks on Monday!

Am I an Anomaly?

I am a teenage writer.  Pretty normal.

With a completed a novel.  A little less normal.

Who has poured time and energy into improving her craft.  Pretty unusual.

Whose writing might be publishable sometime soon.  Anomaly?

I’m just curious – how many other teenager writers out there are serious about writing?  I feel like the answer is not that many.  For example, if I Google “teenager writing tips,” I get a bunch of articles full of stuff I already know.  It feels as if everyone assumes that teenage writer = beginner writer.  Maybe that’s true to some extent, but I don’t feel like a beginner anymore.  Definitely not an expert, but not a beginner.

It seems as though there just aren’t many teens who are committed to writing.

In fact, on Critique Circle, there’s an entire forum committed to “teenage writers.”  But it’s almost never used.  Maybe most teenage writers simply never bother to get outside feedback on their writing.

I feel like I have this conversation every few weeks:

Me: I enjoy writing.

Friend: Oh.  That’s cool.  I’ve written a couple stories, but I’ve never let anyone read them.

Me: Nice!  Ever thought about writing a novel?

Friend: Haha, no.  You?

Me: Oh.  Well… yeah. I wrote a book.

Friend: …

Me: …

Friend: …you wrote

Friend: …you wrote a book?

Me: Yeah.

Friend: What?  That’s… wow.  Can I read it?

They’re always so surprised.  Taken aback, even.  It was a bit frightening at first, but now I’m more used to it.  I have a better idea of what questions they are going to ask, and how to answer them.

But seriously – how many other teenagers have written a novel?  I’ve heard of the few-and-far-between stories, like Christopher Paolini, who wrote Eragon when he was fifteen or something.

But I haven’t really bumped into a lot of other serious teen writers.  Most of my critique exchanges on CC have been with adults.  Most of the writing blogs I follow are by adults.  Most of the followers on my blog are adults.  (Nothing against adults!  I love you all!)

Most of the people that get their books published are adults.

So am I an anomaly?  And if so, am I okay with that?  Am I okay with one day telling my friends that I’ve gotten a book published?

Maybe I’m wrong.  Maybe you’ve met some teen writers who know what they’re doing and have a semi-coherent plan for getting published.

But honestly, I haven’t.

That’s alright.  I’ll be an adult in a few years anyway.  And until then, I’ll just be what I am: a writer.  If I’m an anomaly at the same time, then so be it.